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  6. Summary: Food Labeling: Revision of the Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels (Proposed Rule) and Food Labeling: Serving Sizes of Foods That Can Reasonably Be Consumed At One Eating Occasion; Dual-Column Labeling; Updating, Modifying, and Establishing Ce
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Summary: Food Labeling: Revision of the Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels (Proposed Rule) and Food Labeling: Serving Sizes of Foods That Can Reasonably Be Consumed At One Eating Occasion; Dual-Column Labeling; Updating, Modifying, and Establishing Ce

Summary: Food Labeling: Revision of the Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels (Proposed Rule) and Food Labeling: Serving Sizes of Foods That Can Reasonably Be Consumed At One Eating Occasion; Dual-Column Labeling; Updating, Modifying, and Establishing Ce

FDA has developed one comprehensive preliminary regulatory impact analysis that presents the costs and benefits of the proposed rule entitled Food Labeling: Revision of the Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels as well as the proposed rule entitled Food Labeling: Serving Sizes of Foods That Can Reasonably Be Consumed at One Eating Occasion; Dual Column Labeling; Updating, Modifying, and Establishing Certain Reference Amounts Customarily Consumed; Serving Size for Breath Mints; and Technical Amendments taken together.

Costs of complying with the proposed rules include undertaking a major redesign of the labels of certain products for some food manufacturers, while, for others, the requirements would entail undertaking a minor label change. Some manufacturers may also need to reformulate their product to continue to make certain health claims and nutrient content claims, or choose to reformulate in response to new information appearing on the label. FDA estimates that there would be approximately 60,000 manufacturers and over 700,000 UPCs covered by the proposed rules.

To quantify the benefits of the proposed rules, FDA extrapolated from the welfare effects estimated in a retrospective study on the impact of NLEA by Abaluck (2011). Abaluck (2011) measured the consumer welfare gains as the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for nutrient content based on revealed preference data, i.e., food consumption and prices.

Regulatory Impact Analysis

Food Labeling: Revision of the Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels (Proposed Rule) and Food Labeling: Serving Sizes of Foods That Can Reasonably Be Consumed At One Eating Occasion; Dual-Column Labeling; Updating, Modifying, and Establishing Certain Reference Amounts Customarily Consumed; Serving Size for Breath Mints; and Technical Amendments (Proposed Rule)

Nutition and Supplement Facts:

Federal Register: 79 FR 11879 (March 3, 2014)

Docket: FDA-2012-N-1210

Serving Size:

Federal Register: 70 FR 11989 (March 3, 2014)

Docket: FDA-2004-N-0258