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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Training and Continuing Education

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Course Descriptions & Objectives

 

 

ORA U Level 1 Curriculum

Posted: March 30, 2006

The on line course curriculum is designed to satisfy the new hire training requirements of Standard 2, Trained Regulatory Staff, of the FDA’s draft Voluntary National Retail Food Regulatory Program Standards.

Prevailing Statutes, Regulations and Ordinances
FDA35 – Basic Food Law for State Regulators
FDA38 – Basics of Inspection: Beginning an Inspection
FDA39 – Basics of Inspections: Issues and Observations

Public Health Principles
FDA36 – Public Health Principles

Microbiology
MIC01 - Food Microbiological Control 1: Overview of Microbiology
MIC02 - Food Microbiological Control 2A:Gram-Negative Rods
MIC03 - Food Microbiological Control 2B: Gram-Positive Rods & Cocci
MIC04 - Food Microbiological Control 3: Foodborne Viruses
MIC05 - Food Microbiological Control 4: Foodborne Parasites
MIC16 - Food Microbiological Control: Mid-Series Exam
MIC06 - Food Microbiological Control 5: Controlling Growth Factors
MIC07 - Food Microbiological Control 6: Control by Refrigeration and Freezing
MIC08 - Food Microbiological Control 7A: Control by Thermal Processing
MIC09 - Food Microbiological Control 7B: Control by Pasteurization
MIC10 - Food Microbiological Control 7C: Control by Retorting
MIC11 - Food Microbiological Control 8: Technology-based Food Processes
MIC12 - Food Microbiological Control 9: Natural Toxins
MIC13 - Food Microbiological Control 10: Aseptic Sampling
MIC14 - Food Microbiological Control 11: Good Manufacturing Practices
MIC15 - Food Microbiological Control 12: Cleaning and Sanitizing

Epidemiology
FI01 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 1: Collecting Surveillance Data
FI02 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 2: Beginning an Investigation
FI03 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 3: Expanding the Investigation
FI04 - Foodborne Illness Investigations 4: Conducting a Food Hazard Review
FI05 - Foodborne Illness Investigations 5: Epidemiological Statistics
FI06 - Foodborne Illness Investigations 6: Final Report

HACCP
FDA16 – Basics of HACCP: Overview of HACCP
FDA17 – Basics of HACCP: Prerequisite Programs and Preliminary Steps
FDA18 – Basics of HACCP: The Principles

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FDA36 – Public Health Principles
After completing this course, you will be able to identify the definitions of terms associated with public health, recognize the public health services, and identify the function of public health. You will also be able to recognize the chain of events that leads to disease, and the types of transmission. Finally, you will be able to recognize several aspects of disease control.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Identify the mission of public health.
  • Identify the definitions of health, disease, communicable disease, non-communicable disease, chronic disease, carrier, contamination, and epidemiology.
  • Recognize John Snow’s contribution to the field of epidemiology.
  • Be aware of the concerns of the public health field.
  • Identify the three core public health functions.
  • Recognize the ten essential public health services.
  • Identify the five “links” in the chain that leads to disease and the properties of each.
  • Recognize the factors that determine host susceptibility to a disease.
  • Recognize the four primary transmission vehicles.
  • Differentiate between direct and indirect disease transmission.
  • Differentiate between animate and inanimate vehicles of transmission.
  • Recognize how to control a disease.
  • Differentiate between passive and active immunizations.
  • Identify the five factors that contribute to susceptibility to disease and the properties of each.
  • Recognize the impacts of food and water contamination.

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FDA35 – Basic Food Law for State Regulators
This course addresses the basic concepts of law that are applied to enforcing food law; the legal requirements that apply to food establishments; the legal remedies available to FDA if the food establishment owner/operator fails to comply with the FD&C Act; the role, responsibilities, and activities of the FDA Investigator; and how the Investigator should prepare for a court appearance. It also addresses the inspection process, decision-making, and the types of evidence that may be collected during an inspection.
This course is not intended to give legal advice to the reader. The substantive law and legal procedures are different from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.
Length: 60 mins
CEUs: 0.1
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize the hierarchies of law that exist in the US
  • Differentiate between laws, regulations, and policies
  • Recognize the basic concepts that apply to enforcing food law
  • Identify the meaning of Police Power, Due Process, and Equal Protection
  • Recognize the initial requirements for the owner or operator of a food establishment
  • Identify the purpose of licensure
  • Recognize what happens if an owner/operator does not consent to an inspection or withdraws consent during an inspection
  • Recognize the liability of a food establishment owner/operator
  • Identify the three duties of the public health official
  • Differentiate between the two types of decision-making
  • Identify why it is important to communicate decisions clearly
  • Identify the primary activity of the public health official
  • Differentiate between inspection and search
  • Identify the activities that occur during an inspection
  • Identify the types of evidence that may be collected during an inspection
  • Recognize the importance of taking good notes during an inspection
  • Identify the remedies that are available if the establishment repeatedly fails to comply with the law
  • Identify the behaviors that you should demonstrate when testifying in court
  • Identify the role of hearsay in a trial

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FDA38 – Basics of Inspection: Beginning an Inspection
After completing this course, you will be able to identify how to prepare for an inspection. You will also recognize how to properly deal with management and recognize initial observations you should make at the start of an inspection. In addition, you will identify the purpose of a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan. You will also recognize what to look for when searching for potential food contaminants, and you will identify examples of chemical and physical hazards. Finally, you will recognize the purpose of corrective actions.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize what to look for when reviewing the history of the facility to be inspected.
  • Identify recommended equipment and supplies needed during an inspection.
  • Recognize the proper attire for an inspection.
  • Recognize how to best deal with management when beginning an inspection.
  • Identify initial observations during an inspection.
  • Identify the definition of HACCP.
  • Recognize observations for food flow cycles.
  • Recognize observations for time/temperature controls.
  • Recognize how to identify if a food is potentially hazardous.
  • Recognize where and what to look for when searching for product cross-contamination.
  • Identify the definition of a chemical hazard.
  • Recognize examples of chemical hazards.
  • Identify the definition of a physical hazard.
  • Recognize examples of physical hazards.
  • Recognize why corrective actions are needed.
  • Recognize the importance of a recall/traceback program.

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FDA39 – Basics of Inspections: Issues and Observations
After completing this course, you will be able to identify the unsatisfactory practices that lead to contaminated food, including: processing equipment issues; employee practices; food storage/display issues; contamination; and water supply and plumbing concerns. You will also be able to recognize proper sampling procedures. In addition, you will be able to identify what to include in an inspection report and how to conduct a closing conference at the conclusion of an inspection.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize poor hygienic practices.
  • Recognize what constitutes bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat foods.
  • Recognize proper handwashing procedures.
  • Recognize the potential contamination that may come from ill employees.
  • Recognize the importance of food safety training programs.
  • Recognize cleaning and sanitation issues to look for while inspecting processing equipment.
  • Recognize how to identify equipment condition issues.
  • Recognize what constitutes improper use of equipment.
  • Recognize the need for equipment to perform as desired.
  • Recognize approved source requirements.
  • Recognize typical observations of conditions that may indicate a problem with foods offered for sale.
  • Recognize proper label compliance procedures.
  • Recognize examples of poor practices that result in cross-contamination.
  • Recognize proper storage and disposal of objectionable products.
  • Recognize conditions that indicate the presence of pests.
  • Recognize how to determine if a water source is approved.
  • Recognize proper water temperatures for various activities that use water.
  • Recognize proper plumbing systems for food facilities.
  • Recognize proper warewashing procedures.
  • Recognize the purpose of a sample.
  • Identify the steps in sampling and the properties of each step.
  • Recognize information that should be included in the inspection report.
  • Identify the purpose of evidence documentation in the inspection report.
  • Recognize the usefulness of photographs in the inspection report.
  • Recognize how to handle corrections to the inspection report.
  • Identify supporting documents that should be reviewed.
  • Recognize the critical elements of the closing conference.
  • Identify the individual(s) that should be present during the closing conference.
  • Recognize how to handle disputes.

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FDA16 – Basics of HACCP: Overview of HACCP 
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) is a food safety management system designed for use in all segments of the food industry. This course provides an introduction to HACCP and is the first in the three-part Basics of HACCP series. Basics of HACCP is intended for individuals involved with the control of food safety at any point in the food industry. There are no prerequisites.
Length: 60 mins
CEUs: 0.1
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recall characteristics of HACCP and CCP.
  • Recall characteristics of a HACCP plan and a HACCP system.
  • Recall key developments involved in the origin of HACCP.
  • Identify factors that make HACCP important to the U.S. and global food supply.
  • Identify the benefits gained from using HACCP.
  • Recall specific U.S. and foreign government organizations that utilize HACCP.

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FDA17– Basics of HACCP: Prerequisite Programs and Preliminary Steps
After completing this course, you will be able to recognize important prerequisite programs for a HACCP system, including basic sanitation, good facility design, and proper personal hygiene practices, and recognize how these prerequisite programs help make a HACCP system successful. You will also be able to identify the five preliminary steps to developing a HACCP plan and recognize how those steps benefit HACCP plan development. Finally, you will recognize other practices that must be in place before you implement a HACCP plan.
Length: 60 mins
CEUs: 0.1
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recall specific prerequisite programs.
  • Identify characteristics of prerequisite programs.
  • Recognize the benefits of prerequisite programs.
  • Recognize how prerequisite programs provide a foundation for a successful HACCP system.
  • Recognize the five preliminary steps to developing a HACCP plan.
  • Identify appropriate members of the HACCP team.
  • Recognize the benefit of assembling a HACCP team.
  • Recognize how to describe the food and its distribution.
  • Recognize the benefit of describing the food and its distribution.
  • Recognize how to describe the intended use and consumers of the product.
  • Recognize the benefit of describing the intended use and consumers of the product.
  • Recognize how to develop a flow diagram describing the process under consideration.
  • Recognize the benefit of developing and verifying the flow diagram.
  • Recognize the practices that should be in place for the successful implementation of a HACCP plan.

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FDA18 – Basics of HACCP: The Principles 
After taking this course, you will know the fundamental principles of a HACCP system and be able to provide critical support to the food establishments you inspect. You will also recognize how to analyze hazards, determine Critical Control Points (CCPs), and establish critical limits, monitoring procedures, corrective actions, verification procedures, and recordkeeping systems.
Length: 60 mins
CEUs: 0.1
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Identify the seven principles of HACCP.
  • Recognize the purpose of the HACCP principles.
  • Identify potential food hazards.
  • Distinguish between biological, chemical, and physical hazards.
  • Recognize how hazards are analyzed.
  • Recognize how to determine CCPs.
  • Recognize how to use a CCP decision tree.
  • Apply the use of a CCP decision tree to a real-life scenario.
  • Identify the definition of critical limit.
  • Recognize how to establish critical limits for a CCP.
  • Identify monitoring procedures for CCPs.
  • Recognize how to establish monitoring procedures.
  • Identify the definition of corrective actions.
  • Recognize the two main objectives of corrective actions.
  • Recognize how to establish corrective actions in a HACCP plan.
  • Identify the purpose of verification procedures.
  • Recognize how to establish verification procedures.
  • Distinguish between validation of the HACCP plan and verification procedures.
  • Identify the documents that should be included as part of the HACCP system.
  • Recognize how to conduct a records review.

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FI01 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 1: Collecting Surveillance Data 
After completing this course, you will be able to recognize the importance of developing and maintaining a surveillance system, identify sources of surveillance information (including FoodNet and PulseNet), recognize the reportable disease process used in the U.S., recognize the procedures for using a surveillance log, and distinguish between passive and active surveillance.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Identify the characteristics of surveillance systems.
  • Recognize the importance of a surveillance system.
  • Recognize common sources of surveillance information.
  • Recognize passive surveillance.
  • Recognize the reportable disease process used in the U.S.
  • Recognize a surveillance log.
  • Recognize active surveillance.
  • Distinguish between passive and active surveillance.
  • Identify the characteristics of FoodNet.
  • Identify the characteristics of PulseNet.

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FI02 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 2: Beginning an Investigation 
After completing this course, you will know how to prepare for a foodborne illness investigation and assemble an investigation team. You will recognize the information you need to gather when a consumer makes an initial complaint and when a foodborne illness is suspected. You will also recognize how to surmise data from a surveillance log, decide whether to initiate follow-up action, and develop a hypothesis and case definition for each investigation.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize the importance of being prepared for a potential foodborne illness investigation.
  • Identify equipment, forms, and other items needed for a foodborne illness investigation.
  • Recognize the importance of having a foodborne illness investigation team in place.
  • Identify members of a foodborne illness investigation team
  • Identify information that must be obtained during an initial consumer complaint.
  • Identify information that must be obtained when a foodborne illness is suspected.
  • Associate specific symptoms with typical onset periods.
  • Identify different causal associations that may be quickly surmised from surveillance log data.
  • Interpret information on a surveillance log.
  • Recognize when to follow up on an outbreak.
  • Recognize different response options for following up on a suspected outbreak
  • Recognize the first steps to take during a foodborne illness investigation.
  • Recognize how to develop a hypothesis to focus the investigation.
  • Identify the objectives of a foodborne illness investigation.
  • Recognize the purpose of a case definition.
  • Recognize how to develop a case definition for a foodborne illness investigation.

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FI03 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 3: Expanding the Investigation 
After completing this course, you will know how to conduct an interview, recognize case definitions, and find additional cases. You will also know how to use questionnaires, line lists, and epidemic curves to gather and organize information. Finally, you will know when to implement control measures and how to deal with the media during an investigation.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Topic Objectives:

  • Recognize the purpose of interviewing.
  • Identify techniques that are important during an interview.
  • Recognize the role of the case definition in an outbreak investigation.
  • Identify the different classifications of case definitions.
  • Recognize how to find additional cases.
  • Recognize the role of a questionnaire in an outbreak investigation.
  • Identify features of outbreak questionnaires.
  • Identify the characteristics of a line list.
  • Recognize how to use a line list.
  • Recognize how to use an attack rate table.
  • Identify the characteristics of an epidemic curve.
  • Recognize how to use an epidemic curve.
  • Associate epidemic curve characteristics with three types of outbreaks.
  • Recognize when control measures should be implemented.
  • Identify control measures that may be put into place during an investigation.
  • Identify the definition of primary and secondary contacts and cases.
  • Recognize how to deal with the media during an outbreak investigation.

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FI04 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 4: Conducting a Food Hazard Review 
After completing this course, you will know what a food hazard review is, how to plan for one, and how to interview key people. You will be able to identify factors that affect the growth of pathogens, contamination and survival opportunities for these pathogens, and the how and why of collecting samples. Finally, you will know how to implement control measures and handle any information gathered during the food hazard review.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Define food hazard review.
  • Identify the purpose of a food hazard review.
  • Recognize the unique nature of a food hazard review.
  • Identify factors that contribute to the contamination of foods.
  • Identify factors that affect the survival and persistence of pathogens.
  • Identify factors affecting the growth of pathogens.
  • Recognize how to plan for a food hazard review.
  • Identify records and files you should review.
  • Recognize how to make initial contact with facility management.
  • Recognize how to interview employees.
  • Recognize how to conduct the walk-through portion of the food hazard review.
  • Identify why samples are collected.
  • Identify precautions to take when collecting samples.
  • Recognize the importance of sample integrity.
  • Identify the types of samples that should be collected during a foodborne illness investigation.
  • Recognize examples of clinical, environmental, and food samples.
  • Identify who on the investigation team should collect clinical samples.
  • Identify control measures that can be implemented to limit the spread of disease.
  • Recognize how to handle conflicting data.
  • Recognize the importance of recording data with that from other investigations.

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FI05 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 5: Epidemiological Statistics 
After completing this course, you will understand basic statistical analyses of outbreak data. You will be able to describe a population at risk for illness and determine the confidence that should be placed in an investigation’s results. You will also understand the characteristics of cohort and case-control studies. Finally, you will know the purpose of a statistical hypothesis and the criteria for inferring a causal relationship between an implicated food and an illness. A calculator may be needed in this course.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize how to statistically describe the population at risk.
  • Calculate the mean value for a given set of data.
  • Calculate the median value for a given set of data.
  • Distinguish between mean and median values.
  • Calculate the range of a given data set.
  • Calculate relative risk.
  • Calculate an odds ratio.
  • Distinguish between relative risk and odds ratio.
  • Identify the definition of risk difference.
  • Identify when to use a cohort study.
  • Recognize the characteristics of a cohort study.
  • Calculate relative risk given a 2 x 2 contingency table.
  • Identify when to use a case-control study.
  • Recognize the characteristics of a case-control study.
  • Calculate odds ratio given a 2 x 2 contingency table.
  • Recognize the purpose of a statistical hypothesis.
  • Identify the two types of hypotheses.
  • Recognize the criteria for inferring a causal relationship.
  • Recognize the criteria for taking action before you have laboratory confirmation.

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FI06 – Foodborne Illness Investigations 6: Final Report 
After completing this course, you will recognize the components that should be included in most final reports and the necessary steps for creating and submitting a helpful final report. You will also be familiar with the stylistic rules you need to follow when generating a final report.
Length: 30 mins
CEUs: NA
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize the purpose of a final report.
  • Identify basic rules that should be followed when creating a final report.
  • Identify each component of a final report.
  • Recognize what information should be included in each report component.
  • Identify the 10 steps to follow when writing a final report.
  • Recognize what information should be included when you complete each step.

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MIC01 – Food Microbiological Control 1: Overview of Microbiology 
After completing this course, you should be able to identify microorganisms that may be found in food, describe the growth phases of bacteria, explain the ideal conditions for bacterial growth, recognize types of foodborne illnesses, and recognize conventional and rapid methods of testing for bacteria in food. Although this course mainly addresses bacteria, much of the information also applies to controlling yeasts and molds.
Length: 60 mins
CEUs: 0.1
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Define microorganism.
  • Recall the two different types of fungi.
  • Recall the basic features of bacteria, viruses, and parasites.
  • Describe the four-phase growth cycle of bacteria.
  • Identify the purpose of each of the four phases in the growth cycle of bacteria.
  • Recognize how the following conditions can be used to control the growth of bacteria: nutrients, temperature, water activity, atmosphere, and pH.
  • Recognize how chemical inhibitors can be used to control the growth of bacteria.
  • Describe characteristics of foodborne infection, intoxication, and toxicoinfection.
  • Recognize general laboratory procedures taken when a food sample is sent for testing.
  • Recognize conventional methods of testing for foodborne pathogen contamination.
  • Identify rapid methods of testing for foodborne pathogen contamination.

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MIC02 – Food Microbiological Control 2A:Gram-Negative Rods 
After completing this course, you will be able to identify some of the growth characteristics of foodborne bacterial pathogens, symptoms and characteristics of diseases that they cause, some potentially hazardous foods and processes associated with these pathogens, and some of the control measures that will enable you to minimize the potential for foodborne illnesses due to these pathogens. Six different bacterial pathogens are covered in this course: Yersinia spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, and Vibrio spp.
Length: 60 mins
CEUs: 0.1
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recall characteristics of Yersinia.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Yersinia.
  • Recall characteristics of Salmonella.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Salmonella.
  • Recall characteristics of Shigella.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Shigella.
  • Recall characteristics of Campylobacter jejuni.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Campylobacter jejuni.
  • Recall characteristics of Escherichia coli.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Escherichia coli.
  • Recall characteristics of Vibrio spp.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Vibrio spp.

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MIC03 – Food Microbiological Control 2B: Gram-Positive Rods & Cocci 
After completing this course you should be able to identify some of the growth characteristics and sources of foodborne bacterial pathogens, recognize some of the symptoms and characteristics of diseases caused by pathogens, identify some potentially hazardous foods and processes associated with pathogens, and recognize some of the control measures needed to minimize the potential for foodborne illness. We will cover five bacterial pathogens in this course: Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, Bacillus cereus, and Staphylococcus aureus.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recall characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Listeria monocytogenes.
  • Recall characteristics of Clostridium perfringens.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Clostridium perfringens.
  • Recall characteristics of Clostridium botulinum.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Clostridium botulinum.
  • Recall characteristics of Bacillus cereus.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Bacillus cereus.
  • Recall characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus.
  • Recall control measures used to prevent foodborne illness from Staphylococcus aureus.

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MIC04 – Food Microbiological Control 3: Foodborne Viruses 
After completing this course you should be able to distinguish between bacteria and viruses, describe how foodborne viruses are transmitted, identify characteristics of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) and Norwalk-like viruses (SRSVs), and explain methods used to control viral foodborne illnesses.
Length: 60 mins
CEUs: 0.1
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize characteristics of bacteria.
  • Recognize characteristics of viruses.
  • Recognize how contaminated estuarine water can lead to foodborne viruses.
  • Recognize how contaminated irrigation and drinking water can lead to foodborne viruses.
  • Recognize how poor personal hygiene practices can lead to foodborne viruses.
  • Recognize why detecting foodborne viruses has been difficult.
  • Recognize how viruses replicate.
  • Identify characteristics of Hepatitis A Virus.
  • Identify prevention and elimination techniques.
  • Identify the nature of the available vaccine.
  • Identify characteristics of the Norwalk-like viruses.
  • Identify prevention and elimination techniques.
  • Explain the particular concerns of viruses in shellfish.
  • Explain methods used to control viral foodborne illnesses.

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MIC05 – Food Microbiological Control 4: Foodborne Parasites 
After completing this course you should be able to recognize some of the characteristics of foodborne parasitic protozoa, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes, recognize how foodborne parasites are transmitted, and identify some effective control measures for foodborne parasites.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize characteristics of Cyclospora cayetanensis
  • Recognize characteristics of Cryptosporidium parvum
  • Recognize characteristics of Giardia lamblia
  • Recognize characteristics of Anisakis.
  • Recognize characteristics of Pseudoterranova decipiens.
  • Recognize characteristics of Nanophyetus salmincola
  • Recognize characteristics of Diphyllobothrium.
  • Recognize how parasites are transmitted through food.
  • Match foodborne parasites with the life cycle stage in which they are transmitted and infect humans.
  • Identify control measures for foodborne parasites.

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MIC16 – Food Microbiological Control: Mid-Series Exam 
This exam is based on the information covered in the following courses:

  • Food Microbiological Control 1: Overview of Microbiology
  • Food Microbiological Control 2A: Gram-Negative Rods
  • Food Microbiological Control 2B: Gram-Positive Rods and Cocci
  • Food Microbiological Control 3: Foodborne Viruses
  • Food Microbiological Control 4: Foodborne Parasites

This exam is to be used after course 4 of the Food Microbiological Control course.
Length: 30 mins
CEUs: NA
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

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MIC06 – Food Microbiological Control 5: Controlling Growth Factors 
Microbiological controls, using a knowledge of pH, water activity, chemical inhibitors, and atmosphere (packaging), will be outlined in this course. After completing this course, you should be able to determine whether a food meets safety requirements through control of pH, water activity, chemical inhibitors, and packaging.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recall the pH values of acid and low acid food categories.
  • Identify acid and low acid foods.
  • Recognize the four methods of acidification.
  • Recognize the concept of fermentation.
  • Recognize how pH is measured in a laboratory.
  • Identify FDA regulations for acidified foods.
  • Identify FDA requirements for processors of acidified foods.
  • Recognize moist foods.
  • Recognize intermediate moisture foods.
  • Recognize low moisture foods.
  • Identify ways to control water activity.
  • Recognize characteristics of commonly used chemical inhibitors.
  • Recognize reduced oxygen packaging.
  • Recognize types of reduced oxygen food packaging.
  • Recognize the concerns with extended shelf life food products in regard to C. botulinum.
  • Recognize characteristics of the hurdle concept.

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MIC07 – Food Microbiological Control 6: Control by Refrigeration and Freezing 
This course discusses keeping foods below 40°F (4°C). After completing this course, you should be able to recognize how refrigeration and freezing are used to control microbiological growth and why hot foods must be cooled rapidly. You should also be able to select an appropriate retail or commercial method for rapidly cooling hot foods and compare the advantages and disadvantages of various thermometers.
Length: 60 mins
CEUs: 0.1
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize the importance of refrigeration for inhibiting bacterial growth.
  • Recognize the importance of freezing for inhibiting bacterial growth.
  • Identify the danger zone for pathogenic microbiological growth.
  • Recognize why cooling after cooking may be a critical function.
  • Identify the two-part cooling standard for cooked foods.
  • Recognize different methods of pre-cooling small volumes of hot foods.
  • Recognize different methods of pre-cooling large volumes of hot foods.
  • Identify different methods of cooling hot foods in a commercial refrigerator or walk-in cooler.
  • Recognize areas of concern for inspecting walk-in coolers.
  • Recognize the use of dial and digital thermometers.
  • Recognize the use of maximum registering thermometers, thermocouple thermometers, and infrared thermometers.
  • Recognize the use of time-temperature indicators.

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MIC08 – Food Microbiological Control 7A: Control by Thermal Processing 
After completing this course, you will be able to identify some of the basic principles of heating, recognize some of the factors that affect a given pathogens’ rate of death from thermal processing, distinguish between some of the various methods of thermal processing, and recognize some of the factors that influence container integrity.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize characteristics of conduction.
  • Recognize characteristics of convection.
  • Recognize characteristics of radiation.
  • Recognize the factors that affect the death rate of microorganisms.
  • Recognize the D value of a thermal process.
  • Recognize the Z value of a thermal process.
  • Recognize the F value of a thermal process.
  • Recognize the characteristics of blanching.
  • Recognize characteristics of the cooking process.
  • Recognize ways to control the cooking process.
  • Recognize hot holding methods.
  • Recognize aseptic processing as a method of thermal processing.
  • Recognize problem areas for the integrity of metal containers
  • Recognize aseptic processing
  • Recognize problem areas for the integrity of retortable pouches

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MIC09 – Food Microbiological Control 7B: Control by Pasteurization 
After completing this course, you should be able to recognize the process of pasteurization, LTLT and HTST pasteurization and other pasteurizers, and pasteurization in finished product containers.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize the definition of pasteurization.
  • Recognize the purpose of pasteurization in certain foods.
  • Identify LTLT pasteurization.
  • Recognize the characteristics of a vat pasteurizer.
  • Identify HTST pasteurization.
  • Recognize how a HTST pasteurizer with a regenerator works.
  • Identify other types of pasteurizers.
  • Recognize the purpose of other types of pasteurizers.
  • Distinguish between batch and continuous pasteurization of food products in their finished product containers.

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MIC10 – Food Microbiological Control 7C: Control by Retorting 
After completing this course, you should be able to describe retorting, describe a heat resistance study, a heat penetration study, and a temperature distribution study, distinguish between the characteristics of horizontal still retorts, other still retorts, and agitating retorts, and recognize some differences of water-based retorts.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize the characteristics of retorting.
  • Identify the three steps of retort process establishment.
  • Recognize the purpose of a heat resistance study.
  • Recognize how a heat resistance study is conducted.
  • Recognize the purpose of a heat penetration study.
  • Recognize how a heat penetration study is conducted.
  • Recognize different factors that affect heat penetration of a product.
  • Recognize the purpose of a temperature distribution study.
  • Recognize how a temperature distribution study is performed.
  • Recognize the characteristics of a horizontal still retort.
  • Recognize some characteristics of a vertical steam retort.
  • Recognize some characteristics of a crateless retort.
  • Recognize some characteristics of a hydrostatic retort.
  • Recognize the characteristics of a continuous agitating (Sterilmatic) retort.
  • Recognize the characteristic of an Orbitort retort.
  • Recognize differences in water-based retorts.

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MIC11 – Food Microbiological Control 8: Technology-based Food Processes 
After completing this course, you should be able to recognize characteristics of food processing using gamma ray and electron beam irradiation, high-intensity pulsed light and electric fields, UV light, high-pressure processing, ohmic heating, and ozone.
Length: 120 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize the characteristics of irradiation.
  • Recognize the different levels of irradiation.
  • Recognize the factors that affect microorganism resistance to radiation.
  • Recognize characteristics of gamma ray irradiation.
  • Recognize potential food industry uses for gamma ray irradiation.
  • Recognize the characteristics of electron beam irradiation.
  • Recognize potential food industry uses for electron beam irradiation.
  • Recognize the characteristics of high-intensity pulsed light.
  • Recognize potential food industry uses for high-intensity pulsed light.
  • Recognize the characteristics of high-intensity pulsed electric fields.
  • Recognize potential food industry uses for high-intensity pulsed electric fields.
  • Recognize the characteristics of ultraviolet light.
  • Recognize potential food industry uses for ultraviolet light.
  • Recognize the characteristics of high-pressure processing.
  • Recognize the potential food industry uses of high-pressure processing.
  • Recognize characteristics of ohmic heating.
  • Recognize potential food industry uses for ohmic heat.
  • Recognize the characteristics of ozone.
  • Recognize potential food industry uses for ozone.

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MIC12 – Food Microbiological Control 9: Natural Toxins 
After completing this course, you should be able to identify natural toxins that may be found in shellfish, finfish, agricultural products, mushrooms, and honey. You will also recognize basic characteristics of some natural toxins, and identify control measures for these toxins.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Recognize characteristics of molluscan shellfish poisoning.
  • Identify control measures for molluscan shellfish toxins.
  • Recognize the characteristics of scombroid poisoning.
  • Identify control measures for scombroid toxin.
  • Recognize the characteristics of ciguatera poisoning.
  • Identify control measures for ciguatera toxin.
  • Recognize the characteristics of tetrodotoxin poisoning.
  • Identify control measures for tetrodotoxin.
  • Recognize the characteristics of mycotoxins such as aflatoxin.
  • Recognize the characteristics of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.
  • Recognize the characteristics of phytohaemagglutinin.
  • Identify control measures for agricultural toxins.
  • Recognize the characteristics of mushroom poisoning.
  • Identify control measures for mushroom toxins.
  • Recognize the characteristics of honey intoxication.
  • Identify control measures for grayanotoxin.

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MIC13 – Food Microbiological Control 10: Aseptic Sampling 
After completing this course, you should recognize what an aseptic sample is, when to take one, and how to prepare for an inspection in which aseptic samples will be collected. You will also learn to identify what equipment to pack for aseptic sampling, recognize how to collect an aseptic sample, and maintain its integrity during transport. Finally, you will be familiar with the documentation required for aseptic samples collected during microbiological inspections.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Identify when to use aseptic sampling techniques.
  • Recognize how to prepare for a microbiological inspection in which aseptic samples will be collected.
  • Identify aseptic sampling equipment.
  • Identify the different types of aseptic samples.
  • Recognize how aseptic samples are collected.
  • Recognize how to maintain sample integrity.
  • Recognize what documentation must accompany an aseptic sample.

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MIC14 – Food Microbiological Control 11: Good Manufacturing Practices 
After completing this course, you should be able to identify the eight key areas of sanitation, relate the eight areas of sanitation to GMPs, and recognize controls for in-plant environmental conditions.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Identify the definition of good manufacturing practices.
  • Recognize the eight key areas of sanitation.
  • Recognize controls for water safety.
  • Relate water safety to GMPs.
  • Recognize controls for food-contact surfaces.
  • Relate food-contact surfaces to GMPs.
  • Recognize controls that prevent cross-contamination.
  • Relate the prevention of cross-contamination to GMPs.
  • Recognize controls for sanitation facilities.
  • Relate sanitation of facilities to GMPs.
  • Recognize controls aimed at protecting food from other contaminants.
  • Relate protection of food from other contaminants to GMPs.
  • Recognize controls for handling and labeling toxic compounds in a food processing facility.
  • Relate handling toxic compounds to GMPs.
  • Recognize measures to control employee health conditions.
  • Relate employee health condition procedures to GMPs.
  • Recognize controls to exclude pests from food processing areas.
  • Relate exclusion of pests to GMPs.

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MIC15 – Food Microbiological Control 12: Cleaning and Sanitizing 
After completing this course, you should be able to identify the purpose of cleaning and sanitizing equipment. You will also be able to recognize common methods of cleaning, fundamental washing considerations, and proper cleaning frequency for some food processing equipment, and compare the use of chemical and thermal sanitizers.
Length: 90 mins
CEUs: 0.2
Available at http://www.eduneering.com/Partners/fdaora

Objectives:

  • Identify the purpose of cleaning and sanitizing equipment.
  • Recognize the steps in cleaning and sanitizing equipment.

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