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In Vitro Detection and Characterization of DNA Adducts Generated by Tobacco Flavorants in Aerosol Using ALI

In Vitro Detection and Characterization of DNA Adducts Generated by Tobacco Flavorants in Aerosol Using ALI

Principal Investigators: Steven Belinsky, Carmine Leggett, Jueichuan (Connie) Kang, and Luis G. Valerio, Jr.

Funding Mechanism: Research Contract

ID number: HHSF223201510001I

Award Date: 9/14/2017

Institution: Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute


Tobacco products contain flavor chemicals that have been determined to be “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) for food products, but for tobacco products, flavor chemicals may be harmful when the flavors themselves or flavor combustion products are inhaled. Researchers will identify DNA adducts for selected tobacco flavors in five different lung or respiratory tract cell types. DNA adducts are formed by chemicals that bind to pieces of DNA, which causes modifications of the DNA. If these modifications are not repaired, cancer may develop. Over two years, five lung or respiratory cell lines that express specific P450 or sulfurtaransferase enzymes will be used to detect DNA adducts from the selected flavors. The researchers will conduct dose-response experiments to develop and confirm the methods for quantifying specific DNA adducts. Based on these dose-response experiments, researchers will then investigate in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) aerosol exposures of the cell lines by adding a flavoring to a propylene glycol/vegetable glycerin solution and measuring the formation of adducts. Study results will provide new information about the health risks associated with tobacco flavorings.