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Ventilation and Pulmonary Endothelium Toxicities (VaPE-Tox) of E-cigarettes: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study

Ventilation and Pulmonary Endothelium Toxicities (VaPE-Tox) of E-cigarettes: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study

Principal Investigator: Elizabeth Oelsner

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health-Grant

ID number: 1R03HL132590-01

Award Date: 5/9/2016

Institution: Columbia University Health Sciences


E-cigarette vapor contains toxicants that may damage lungs and airways, eventually causing chronic lung disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures may be used to detect and characterize the possible acute lung toxicities of e-cigarettes. Two promising approaches -- hyperpolarized helium (3He)-enhanced MRI and an innovative measure of pulmonary microvascular blood flow on gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MRI developed by the researchers -- have never been used to assess e-cigarette lung toxicities. The goal of this 11-day pilot study is to test the acute effects of e-cigarette exposure on the lungs and airways using these MRI approaches in 10 healthy, young adult (ages 21-35) e-cigarette users. After a three-day pre-study period during which participants will abstain from e-cigarette use, participants will be randomized to use a standardized refillable e-cigarette with nicotine on either days 2 and 3 or days 6 and 7 of the study period; participants will then undergo both 3He-enhanced and Gd-enhanced MRI to determine the effects of e-cigarette use on the airways and blood vessels in the lungs. Study findings may provide new information regarding the effects of e-cigarettes on the lungs.