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Vapor and Particulate Phase Smoke Components and Cardiovascular Dysfunction

Principal Investigator: Michael T. Kleinman

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health - Grant

ID number:  1R01ES027232-01

Award Date: 8/22/2016 

Institution: University of California, Irvine


The health risks of waterpipe (hookah) smoking include harmful cardiovascular and pulmonary effects. The goals of this study are: (1) to clarify the role of toxic constituents in waterpipe smoke in the development of cardiopulmonary diseases, and (2) to evaluate the role of inflammation and oxidative stress. After describing the chemical composition of waterpipe smoke, researchers will measure changes in respiration, electrocardiographic patterns, and cardiac function during and after acute and chronic waterpipe smoke exposure in mice that are genetically susceptible to atherosclerosis using implanted telemetry devices. Study aims are: (1) to use state-of-the-art analytical methods to identify potentially harmful constituents in waterpipe smoke; (2) to assess the redox and electrophilic properties of gas- and particle-phase components present in waterpipe smoke extracts using in vitro systems that explore various mechanisms of action; and (3) to assess the cardiopulmonary toxicity of waterpipe smoke in mice experiencing acute and chronic exposures in order to assess the impact of inflammation and oxidative stress on the lungs, brain, and cardiovascular system. This study will be among the first to evaluate the cardiopulmonary toxicity of waterpipe smoke by in vitro and in vivo assays.