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USC TCORS: Adolescent Smoking: Vulnerability to Tobacco Use and Marketing across Life

Principal Investigator: Rob McConnell

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health- TCORS Grant

ID number: 1P50CA180905-01

Award Date: 9/19/2013

Institution: University of Southern California


This project will study adolescent smoking, tobacco use trajectories, use topography, and susceptibility to marketing in an established population-based cohort. Using smoking data from 12,078 largely Hispanic and non-Hispanic White participants recruited from Southern California schools into the Children's Health Study cohort between 1993 and 2002, investigators will use statistical modeling to characterize adolescent cigarette smoking trajectories based on initiation and progression patterns. Investigators will assess associations of these trajectories with neighborhood and community environmental, demographic, and social factors, and with marketing exposure, based on tobacco retailer proximity and density at home, school, and a novel route-to-school metric. Samples of 300 smokers and 300 at-risk non-smokers in the younger wave of recruitment (currently aged 17-18) and 450 smokers from earlier waves (currently aged 26-36) will be re-interviewed and followed prospectively to assess the relationships of early life smoking trajectory with tobacco product perception, attitudes, beliefs, persistence of use and cessation difficulty. Point-of-sale marketing, electronic, social media, and interpersonal influences that amplify the risk of different trajectories of childhood tobacco use will be identified. Specific aims are: (1) to characterize adolescent cigarette smoking trajectories based on initiation and progression; (2) to examine the impact of early life smoking trajectory on new and traditional tobacco product use and on perceptions, attitudes and beliefs about these products, (3) to assess the relationship between specific tobacco product use (e.g., cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigars, little cigars, cigarillos, bidis, kreteks, pipes, snus, dissolvables, e-cigarettes, hookah) and prior perceptions, attitudes, beliefs, and marketing exposure; and (4) to use structural equation modeling to integrate information on early life smoking phenotype, marketing, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs across life stage. Study findings related to smoking trajectories, new and traditional product use, and marketing exposure may help inform FDA regulatory efforts.


USC Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science for Vulnerable Populations (TCORS) Related Resources

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