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UNC TCORS: Mouse Models of Smoking-related Diseases: What is the Best Mimic of Human Disease?

Principal Investigator: Claire Doerschuk

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health- TCORS Grant

ID number: 1P50HL120100-01

Award Date: 9/19/2013

Institution: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill


Most mouse models of tobacco smoke-related lung disease have produced evidence of mild-to-moderate emphysema but little or no evidence of chronic bronchitis, which is a large component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in humans. This project will establish a novel mouse model of tobacco smoke-induced lung injury that mimics the chronic bronchitis phenotype seen in humans with COPD. Investigators will identify validated animal models that can establish standard toxicity changes and confirm what magnitudes correlate with changes in human health outcomes. Specific aims are: (1) to determine the effects of cigarette smoke on inflammatory and innate immunity, muco-ciliary and bacterial clearances, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and microRNA (miR) expression, and intracellular signaling pathways induced by 1-day, 5-day and 6-month exposure; and (2) to determine the effects of little cigars and other new and emerging tobacco products (e.g., hookah) on these same parameters induced by 1-day, 5-day and 6-month exposure. This project will provide new information about the adverse respiratory consequences of tobacco smoke and will inform FDA evaluation of new tobacco products.


The Impact of Tobacco Exposure on the Lung's Innate Defense System (TCORS) Related Resources

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