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Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Profiling of Tobacco Products via Organ Microengineering and Systems Biology

Principal Investigator(s):  Erica Clark
    
Funding Mechanism: Research Contract

ID number: HHSF223201810127C

Award Date: 9/19/2018

Institution: University of Colorado Denver


The goal of this study is to advance our recently developed “Breathing-Smoking Human Lung-on-a-Chip” technology to determine the toxic effects of hookah tobacco smoke and e-cigarette emissions. In Phase 1 (18 months) of this project, we will develop a three-dimensional (3D) functional organomimetic human lung airway by combining organ-on-a-chip and 3D bioprinting technologies. The synthetic living human lung will then be validated for recreating physiological responses in vitro. In Phase 2 (6 months), we will enhance a smoking robot prototype by creating add-on modules that will generate fresh whole smoke/vapors from a diverse range of hookah tobacco and e-cigarette products; we will also use tubing with minimal adsorption properties to transfer gases and aerosols and upgrade the control software to execute e-smoking and waterpipe tobacco smoking topographies. In Phase 3 (18 months), we will integrate the lung airway with the smoking robot for system- and organ-level evaluation of tobacco products.  We will expose the synthetic living human lung to freshly produced emissions of two different e-cigarette products and hookah tobacco from two commercial sources and examine pathological responses, including oxidative stress, inflammation, matrix remodeling, pH changes, nicotine absorption, and pre-neoplastic transformation at molecular, cellular, tissue and organ levels. Findings may inform future regulatory activities related to hookah and e-cigarette products.