U.S. flag An official website of the United States government
  1. Home
  2. Tobacco Products
  3. Tobacco Science & Research
  4. Research
  5. Predicting Longitudinal Patterns of Change in Adolescent Polytobacco Use: A Socio-Ecological Framework
  1. Research

Predicting Longitudinal Patterns of Change in Adolescent Polytobacco Use: A Socio-Ecological Framework

Principal Investigator: Melissa Blank

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health – Grant

ID number: 1R21DA051628-01

Award Date: 7/20/2020

Institution: West Virginia University


More information about how patterns of single and polytobacco use change from early adolescence into emerging adulthood would be useful. The goal of this project is to examine patterns of change and associated predictive factors over an extended time period. Study aims are: (1) to examine trajectories and related predictors of single tobacco product use from early adolescence (age 12) to emerging adulthood (age 23); (2) to examine transitions into and out of polytobacco use classes, as well as predictors of these classes, from early adolescence (age 12) to emerging adulthood (age 23), and (3) to examine interactions among individual (e.g., motives for use, sensation seeking), interpersonal (e.g., parent modeling, rules), and contextual (e.g., geographic location) factors in predicting trajectories of single tobacco product use and transitions in polytobacco use. Researchers will analyze Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study data (total of 52,731 respondents) from study waves 1 (2013-2014), 2 (2014-2015), 3 (2015-2016) and 4 (2016-2018) to examine the changes over time in use of tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars, waterpipes, smokeless tobacco, electronic cigarettes) individually and in combination. Study findings may inform regulatory activities related to youth and young adult use of tobacco products. 
 

Back to Top