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Perceptions of Health Risk from Smokeless Tobacco Products and Nicotine Replacement Therapy among Pregnant Women and Women Planning a Pregnancy

Principal Investigator: Lucinda England / Amber Koblitz

Funding Mechanism: Interagency Agreement

ID number: 224-10-9022

Award Date: 11/9/2011

Institution: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


In recent years, tobacco product manufacturers have invested heavily in new smokeless products that may be perceived as safer alternatives to cigarettes. Because pregnant women and women intending to become pregnant are often highly motivated to protect the health of their unborn babies, they may be especially attuned to non-combustible tobacco product messages that expressly state or imply reduced harm. The goal of this study is to explore awareness, knowledge, and perceptions of various smokeless nicotine delivery products (e.g., e-cigarettes, snus, dissolvables) among pregnant women and women who are planning to become pregnant. Focus groups and individual interviews with approximately 100 participants (aged 18-40) will be conducted with pregnant smokers, pregnant women who quit smoking after they became pregnant, and smokers who plan to become pregnant. Focus groups will be conducted in Oklahoma City, OK; Billings, MT; Lexington, KY; and Manchester, NH.  Topics will include awareness of various products; perceptions of health risks (to self and fetus/infant/child) associated with product use; perceptions of the potential for nicotine addiction associated with various products; factors that might influence a product switch or resumption of product use following tobacco cessation; and responses to packaging, advertising, and graphic health warnings. Data will be collected from September 2013 to December 2013. Understanding how non-combustible products are viewed by pregnant women and women intending to become pregnant may help shape communications, policies, and interventions designed to prevent tobacco use in this vulnerable population.
 

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