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Impact of Prenatal Waterpipe Use on Infant Biomarkers and Neurodevelopment

Principal Investigators: Laura R. Stroud and Lori A.J. Scott-Sheldon

Funding Mechanism:  National Institutes of Health - Grant

ID number:  3R01DA042484-01S1

Award Date: 2/3/2017

Institution:  Miriam Hospital


Waterpipe tobacco (hookah, narghile) use has serious health risks similar to those associated with cigarette smoking. Waterpipe use is especially problematic among reproductive-age women because it increases the risk of obstetrical complications, low birth weight, and respiratory problems in newborns. However, although cigarette tobacco and nicotine are known to harm the developing brain, data regarding the effects of waterpipe tobacco use during pregnancy on infant toxic chemical exposure and neurodevelopmental outcomes is lacking.  A prospective, observational, longitudinal study is investigating the impact of flavors and design features on waterpipe use patterns and toxic chemical exposure in pregnant and postpartum current waterpipe users; participants are being provided with information about the health risks of hookah and other tobacco use following assessments. In this supplement, investigators will analyze data from 115 infants of mothers participating in the longitudinal study. Study aims are: (1) to determine the impact of prenatal waterpipe tobacco use, flavors, and design features on biomarkers of infant nicotine and toxic chemical exposure (cotinine, volatile organic compounds [VOCs]), and (2) to determine the impact of prenatal waterpipe tobacco use, flavors, and design features on infant neurodevelopment.  Investigators will collect infants’ urine and saliva to measure nicotine and markers of VOCs, respectively, and will assess neurodevelopment using the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS), a standardized assessment designed to reveal deficits in substance-exposed infants.

 

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