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Impact of Exclusive Use of Low Nicotine Cigarettes on Compensatory Smoking

Impact of Exclusive Use of Low Nicotine Cigarettes on Compensatory Smoking

Principal Investigators: Tracy Smith

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health - Grant

ID number: 1R03DA045197-01

Award Date: 8/24/2017

Institution: University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh


Clinical trials evaluating reduced nicotine content cigarettes generally have not found evidence of compensatory smoking behaviors among participants; however, most participants in low nicotine groups use non-study cigarettes, despite explicit instructions to use only the study cigarettes provided to them. The aim of this study is to test the impact of nicotine reduction on smoking behavior and toxicant exposure when participants do not have access to normal nicotine content cigarettes. Twenty adult smokers (aged 18 years and older) will be confined to a hotel setting for two four-night stays during which they will only have access to research cigarettes. During one hotel stay they will have access to normal nicotine content cigarettes, and during the second hotel stay they will only have access to very low nicotine content cigarettes. Participants will purchase all of their cigarettes using a study bank, and will be able to purchase up to three packs of cigarettes per day. To assess whether smokers engage in compensatory smoking (e.g., smoking more cigarettes, taking longer puffs) as a result of nicotine reduction, biomarkers of smoke and toxicant exposure (e.g., expired carbon monoxide) and behavioral measures of smoking (e.g., cigarettes smoked per day, puff topography) will be compared between the two conditions. This study will provide new information about the effects of reduced nicotine content cigarettes.