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  5. How Consumers Use Flavors to Make Inferences about Electronic Nicotine Delivery System (ENDS) Product Qualities and Intentions to Use (Phase 2)
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How Consumers Use Flavors to Make Inferences about Electronic Nicotine Delivery System (ENDS) Product Qualities and Intentions to Use (Phase 2)

Principal Investigator: Meghan Moran (CTP contact: Lexie Perreras)

Funding Mechanism: Centers of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation Grant (CERSI)

ID number: 3U01FD005942-03S1

Award Date: 9/1/2018

Institution: Johns Hopkins University


This project (Phase 2) will test how different features used to advertise electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) flavors are associated with product appeal and intentions to use the product. Specifically, researchers will examine three features identified previously (Phase 1): the use of flavor-related imagery (e.g., picture of a cherry), the use of flavor name modifiers (e.g., Cherry Crush), and the use of flavor descriptors (e.g., “cool”, “fresh”). In Phase 2, researchers will collect data and conduct six analyses, each with four outcomes: (a) product appeal, (b) curiosity about the product, (c) interest in using the product, and (d) increased positive product perceptions (e.g., likeliness to switch from cigarettes, good taste, health effects). Analyses 1 and 2 will investigate whether absence of a flavor-representing image is associated with decreased outcomes compared to an identical ad with a flavor-representing image, and whether presence of the image is associated with increased outcomes compared to an identical ad without any flavor feature. Analyses 3 and 4 will investigate whether absence of a flavor name modifier is associated with decreased outcomes compared to an identical ad with the modifier, and whether presence of the modifier is associated with increased outcomes compared to an identical ad without any flavor features. Finally, analyses 5 and 6 will investigate whether absence of a flavor descriptor is associated with decreased outcomes compared to an identical ad with the descriptor, and whether presence of a descriptor is associated with increased outcomes compared to an identical ad without any flavor features. Secondary analyses will explore sub-group differences among flavors and brands, as well as effects on broader product perceptions, including relative risk and harm. Findings may inform future regulatory activities related to ENDS flavors and marketing. 
 

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