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Expanding U.S. ITC cohort - Effectiveness of Tobacco Control Policies in High vs. Low Income Countries--Graphic Health Warnings

Expanding U.S. ITC cohort - Effectiveness of Tobacco Control Policies in High vs. Low Income Countries--Graphic Health Warnings

Principal Investigator:  K. Michael Cummings

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health - Grant

ID Number: 3 P01 CA138389-05S1

Award Date: 6/6/2012

Institution: Medical University of South Carolina


This project is a supplement to an existing study that focused on evaluating the style and content of graphic health warning labels (HWLs) that have been implemented in various countries; this evaluation was conducted as part of the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Survey (ITC). The goal of this supplement is to expand the U.S. ITC cohort to include: (1) newly-recruited youth aged 12-17 years, regardless of tobacco use status; (2) newly-recruited young adults aged 18-24 years, regardless of tobacco use status; (3) newly-recruited adult cigarette and non-cigarette tobacco users; and (4) newly recruited former smokers who have quit within the past two years. Data collection will include phone and online interviews with 3,121 adult tobacco users (aged 25+ years), 1,174 young adults tobacco users and non-users (aged 18-14 years), and 1,208 adolescent tobacco users and non-users (aged 12-17 years).  Prior to conducting the surveys, researchers will conduct a series of smaller studies aimed at identifying the measurement methods with the strongest validity, reliability, and feasibility for use in population surveys designed to evaluate how consumers respond to HWLs. These studies will involve:  (1) determining the measurement properties of self-report measures used in the ITC Survey on the cognitive, affective and behavioral impacts of HWLs; 2) testing new questions designed to enhance measurement of key domains of HWL impact (i.e., perceived magnitude of risk, perceived relevance of message, quit-related cognitions and behaviors); and 3) cross-validating self-report measures  identified in the previous stages with “objective” biomarker data from eye-tracking and brain imaging in response to viewing HWLs.  Findings may inform regulatory activities related to HWLs. (Project completed in 2015.)