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Emission Aerosol Constituents and Comparative Toxicology of Electronic Cigarettes with Flavorings

Principal Investigator: Irfan Rahman

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health - Grant

ID number:  3R01HL085613-07S2

Award Date: 9/21/2015

Institution: University of Rochester


Data on the potentially toxic impact of exposure to flavors in e-cigarettes is needed. The goal of this study is to evaluate the aerosol constituents and cellular toxicity of flavored e-cigarettes. Researchers’ preliminary data indicate that flavored e-cigarette aerosols cause varying levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine release in human lung cells. In this study, researchers will use gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) and in vitro cell-based assays to identify the chemicals formed in flavored e-cigarette liquids and vapors and compare their effects on oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammation. Specific aims are: (1) to identify and compare the chemical constituents (including some on FDA’s harmful and potentially harmful constituent [HPHC] list) present in e-liquids and aerosols in selected e-cigarettes with flavorings; and (2) to compare oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses to flavored e-cigarette aerosols in human and mouse lung epithelial cells. Assessment of flavored e-cigarette chemical constituents and toxicity may inform regulatory activities related to e-cigarettes.