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Electronic Cigarette Cardiotoxicity Varies by Flavorings: What Can We Learn from Mice?

Principal Investigator(s): Judith Zelikoff

Funding Mechanism: NIH Grant

ID number: 1R21HL142507-01A1

Award Date: May 21, 2019

Institution: New York University School of Medicine


More information about the potential pulmonary toxicity of e-cigarette flavorings would be useful.  The goal of this study is to evaluate whether long-term (three-month) inhalation exposure of adolescent mice to flavored e-cigarette aerosols leads to changes in pulmonary blood vessels (vasculature) -- such as inflammation, pulmonary remodeling, artery thickening, and increase in right ventricular systolic pressure -- that predispose adult male and female mice to pulmonary hypertension. Researchers selected flavors (vanilla, cinnamon, menthol, double apple hookah, and peach schnapps) based on human usage and published diacetyl levels. The study aim (with multiple sub-aims) is: (1A) to determine whether three-month inhalation exposure of adolescent mice to e-cigarette aerosols (with or without flavorings) produces changes in pulmonary vasculature; (1B) to investigate the time course of effects by examining changes associated with the development of pulmonary hypertension and/or emphysema on days 30, 60, and 90; and (1C) to determine persistent effects 90 days after cessation of the three-month exposure. Study findings may inform regulatory activities related to flavored e-cigarettes.