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CTP Supplement to Parent Grant: Nicotine Delivery from Novel Non-Tobacco Electronic Systems

Principal Investigator: Maciej Lukasz Goniewicz

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health - Grant

ID number: 3 R01 DA037446-02S1

Award Date: 8/12/2015

Institution: Roswell Park Cancer Institute


Data on the inhalation toxicity of flavorings used in electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are limited. The goal of this study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of several of the most popular flavorings in ENDS and ENDS liquids sold in the U.S. This study will assess the concentration, emission, and potential degradation of flavorings from storage or heating as well as the cellular toxicity of different flavorings in ENDS aerosols. Specific aims are: (1) to determine flavoring type and amounts in 32 disposable ENDS products, cartridges and refill solutions, as well as inter-brand and intra-brand variability in flavorings; (2) to determine the stability of flavorings under various storage conditions; (3) to determine flavoring yields in vapors from various types of ENDS; (4) to determine the effect of various product characteristics on flavoring levels in aerosols; (5) to compare the cellular effects of flavored ENDS aerosols versus tobacco smoke; and (6) to establish an evidence base for evaluating potential harm to users. One study, which will address Aims 1 and 2, will involve laboratory analytical chemistry testing of multiple brands and batches of flavored ENDS in order to characterize flavored ENDS products. A second study, which will address Aims 3 and 4, will involve laboratory analytical chemistry testing to determine flavoring yields in aerosols from various types of ENDS. A third study, which will address Aims 5 and 6, will test the cellular toxicity of aerosol generated from flavored ENDS using an air-liquid interface (ALI) model to measure the effects of aerosol on non-cancerous bronchial epithelial cells and mutated lung cancer cell lines. Study findings may inform the development and implementation of standard quality assessment procedures and testing methods for flavored ENDS.