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  1. Tobacco Science & Research

CTP Supplement to Parent Grant: Improved Models to Inform Tobacco Product Regulation

Principal Investigator: Stanton Glantz

Funding Mechanism:  National Institutes of Health - Grant

ID number: 3 P50 CA180890-02S1

Award Date: 1/30/2015

Institution: University of California - San Francisco


The impact of flavors and packaging of cigarettes, cigars, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco are not well known. This supplement to an ongoing study will expand two projects of the University of California San Francisco Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science to include a focus on flavors and package characteristics. Study aims are: 1) to determine how flavors affect perceptions of risks, benefits, attractiveness and acceptability of tobacco products across age groups; 2) to determine how packaging characteristics affect perceptions of whether a product is flavored and perceptions of risks, benefits, attractiveness and acceptability of the product across age groups; 3) to determine the relationships among perceptions of flavored tobacco products and the onset, experimentation, continuation, cessation, relapse, re-initiation, switching, and dual/poly use of tobacco products including cigarettes, cigars, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco; and 4) to determine the effect of flavors on the uptake, retention and rewarding effects of nicotine in users of second-generation e-cigarette devices. The project will collect the needed data by expanding the data collection in existing projects; data will be collected from urban and rural youth and from e-cigarette users who have been recruited to participate in studies of the dynamics of nicotine in the blood of e-cigarette users. Project expansions will extend the Center’s current research examining how flavor effects are mediated by psychosocial and bio-behavioral determinants. Study findings may inform regulatory actions related to tobacco product flavors and packaging.