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A Comparative Effectiveness and Long-Term Health Study in Wisconsin Smokers

A Comparative Effectiveness and Long-Term Health Study in Wisconsin Smokers

Principal Investigator: Michael Fiore

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health- Grant

ID number: 3R01HL109031-02S1

Award Date: 8/1/2013

Institution: University of Wisconsin


Little is known about whether smoking menthol cigarettes produces a different level of tobacco addiction than smoking non-menthol cigarettes. Investigators will analyze the effect of menthol and non-menthol cigarette smoking on tobacco dependence and quitting motivation and success using data from the Wisconsin Smokers Health Study, a five-year longitudinal study that comprises two comparative effectiveness research trials involving 1504 and 1050 subjects. Specific aims are: (1) to use data from the Wisconsin Smokers Health Study to evaluate the relationship between menthol and smoking cessation using biochemically-confirmed smoking abstinence at end-of-treatment and six months post-quit; to collect longitudinal abstinence data at 8-, 12-, and 26-week follow-ups; and to determine the relationship between menthol and smoking cessation specifically for African-Americans; (2) to assess the relationship between menthol smoking and spontaneous quit attempts by measuring quit attempts, abstinent days, and latency to a successful quit attempt among menthol smokers; (3) to identify the most effective smoking cessation pharmacotherapies (i.e., nicotine patch, nicotine lozenge, bupropion, varenicline, nicotine patch plus lozenge, and bupropion plus lozenge) for menthol smokers, and whether menthol and non-menthol smokers differ in response to pharmacotherapies; (4) to identify the factors that mediate menthol smoking status and smoking cessation outcomes, including craving and tobacco dependence severity; and (5) to determine the participant characteristics associated with menthol smoking (e.g., demographics, smoking history, tobacco dependence, genetic markers of tobacco dependence, motivation to quit, attitudinal factors, quality of life, psychiatric status, social network variables, and prequit measures of daily smoking behaviors).


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