U.S. flag An official website of the United States government
  1. Home
  2. Tobacco Products
  3. Tobacco Science & Research
  4. Research
  5. Chronic Hookah (Waterpipe) Smoking, Vascular Dysfunction, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress
  1. Research

Chronic Hookah (Waterpipe) Smoking, Vascular Dysfunction, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

Principal Investigator: Mary Rezk-Hanna

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health – Grant 

ID number: 1R01HL152435-01A1

Award Date: 9/14/2020

Institution: UCLA


The goal of this research is to clarify the long-term health effects of hookah (waterpipe) smoking on endothelial (artery lining) and vascular (blood vessel) function and identify biomarkers of harm that are associated with the effects of chronic hookah smoking on vascular health. Study aims are: (1) to evaluate the chronic effects of hookah smoking on peripheral endothelial function; (2) to study the chronic effects of hookah smoking on central artery stiffness; and (3) to evaluate the chronic effects of hookah smoking on biological markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. In 34 healthy chronic hookah smokers (ages 21-49 years) who never smoked cigarettes, matched for age and sex with 34 cigarette smokers and 34 non/never-smokers, researchers will measure: (a) endothelial function (measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation); and (b) vascular stiffness (measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and aortic augmentation index). Biological markers of inflammation (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, 8-iso-prostaglandin F2a, fibrinogen) and oxidative stress (pro-oxidant high density lipoprotein oxidant index and total antioxidant capacity) will be collected. Findings will provide new information about the chronic effects of hookah smoking and provide a foundation for future long-term studies of the effects of hookah smoking. 
 

Back to Top