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Associations of Youth E-Cig and Tobacco Use: Ecological Momentary Assessment

Principal Investigator: Melissa H. Abadi

Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health - Grant

ID number: 1R03DA041899-01A1

Award Date: 3/13/2017

Institution: Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation


Research suggests that socio-ecological factors, such as e-cigarette access, perceptions, marketing, and use by others, may increase youth susceptibility to future use of combustible tobacco products. This study will use a longitudinal ecological momentary assessment (EMA) approach and a computer-assisted self-interview survey to examine both within-person and between-person associations of factors related to e-cigarette and tobacco use, use intentions, willingness to use, and the role of environment and situational factors on adolescent use of e-cigarettes and tobacco. Data will be collected from 50 adolescents (ages 13-17) who are e-cigarette only users or dual users of e-cigarettes and tobacco and who live in Kentucky, a state where e-cigarette use rates are three times higher than the national average for middle schoolers and two times higher than the national average for high schoolers. Specific aims are: (1) to investigate within-person associations among e-cigarette and tobacco access, motivations, exposure, context, intentions, willingness, and behaviors; (2) to investigate between-person associations among e-cigarette and tobacco beliefs, norms, access, motivations, exposure, context, intentions, willingness, and behaviors; and (3) to explore differences between e-cigarette only users and dual users regarding e-cigarette and tobacco beliefs, access, motivations, exposure, context, intentions, willingness, behaviors, and personal risk factors. Study results may provide preliminary data to guide the design of the larger, more rigorous studies about e-cigarette initiation, use, perceptions, and transition to other tobacco products.