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Assessment of Genotoxic Potential of Serially Diluted Whole Tobacco Smoke using Ames, Micronucleus, and Pig-A Assays

Assessment of Genotoxic Potential of Serially Diluted Whole Tobacco Smoke using Ames, Micronucleus, and Pig-A Assays

Principal Investigators: Steven Belinsky and Eric Beier

Funding Mechanism: Research Contract

ID number: HHSF223201510001I

Award Date: 9/15/2017

Institution: Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute


Information about the genotoxic (gene toxicity) potential of whole smoke generated from commercial cigarettes is useful in evaluating health risk. The goal of this study is to test the genotoxicity of diluted whole smoke generated from research and commercial cigarettes using three standard genotoxicity assays (the Ames test, the micronucleus assay, and the Pig A assay). The top eight cigarettes in the U.S. will be selected based on their market volume. Researchers will use an air-liquid interface cell exposure system to expose human bronchial epithelial cells and cardiac cells to diluted whole smoke generated using the International Standards Organization (ISO) and Health Canada Intense (HCI) smoking regimens. Researchers will measure levels of tar/nicotine/carbon monoxide (TNCO), acrolein, acetaldehyde, tobacco-specific nitrosamines (NNN and NNK), formaldehyde, and benzo[a]pyrene. Total particulate matter and gas-vapor phase from the mainstream smoke will also be tested separately using both smoking regimens for comparison purposes. Study findings will provide new information regarding the genotoxic effects of cigarette smoke.