U.S. flag An official website of the United States government
  1. Home
  2. Tobacco Products
  3. Tobacco Science & Research
  4. Research
  5. Assessing the Impacts of the Four 2019/2020 US Federal-Level Tobacco Control Actions: Flavors, Youth Marketing, Youth Access, and Tobacco 21
  1. Research

Assessing the Impacts of the Four 2019/2020 US Federal-Level Tobacco Control Actions: Flavors, Youth Marketing, Youth Access, and Tobacco 21

Principal Investigator: Karin Kasza
Funding Mechanism: National Institutes of Health - Grant
ID Number: 1R21DA053614-01
Award Date: 4/20/2021
Institution: Roswell Park Cancer Institute Corporation


Four key federal-level tobacco control actions were taken in the U.S. in December 2019/January 2020 to reduce electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS)/tobacco use appeal and access, particularly among young people. These four actions were: (1) ENDS Flavors/Device Guidance, in which FDA prioritized enforcement against “any flavored, cartridge-based ENDS product (other than a tobacco- or menthol-flavored ENDS product),” (2) ENDS Marketing Guidance, in which FDA prioritized enforcement against “any ENDS product that is targeted to minors or whose marketing is likely to promote use of ENDS by minors,” (3) ENDS Access Guidance, in which FDA prioritized enforcement against “all other ENDS products for which the manufacturer has failed to take (or is failing to take) adequate measures to prevent minors’ access,” and (4) Federal T21, in which the federal minimum age of sale of tobacco products was raised from 18 to 21 years. Around the same time, two national public health events occurred that likely also contributed to population-level changes in ENDS/tobacco use behaviors: an outbreak of ENDS/vaping-associated lung injury (EVALI) was identified by CDC in August 2019, and the spread of a novel coronavirus in the US in January 2020 (COVID19). The shared historical timing of these actions and events requires innovative methods to assess the specific impacts of each federal action. Researchers will use a theoretically grounded mediational model to disentangle overall impacts into action-specific impacts. They will conduct secondary data analyses using the following sources: two complementary nationally-representative data sources, which each assess key measures of appeal and access and together include over 61,000 participants; the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study youth and adult surveys (2017-2021); and the U.S. arm of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Project youth and adult surveys (2018-2021). Study findings will contribute to an understanding of the impacts of each action on Americans’ ENDS/tobacco use behaviors. 
 

Back to Top