2003N-0573 Draft Animal Cloning Risk Assessment
FDA Comment Number : EC615
Submitter : Mr. Bryan Baker Date & Time: 01/04/2007 09:01:27
Organization : Mr. Bryan Baker
Category : Individual Consumer
Issue Areas/Comments
GENERAL
GENERAL
I oppose any approval to permit cloned animals or their offspring into the food supply for three reasons:
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1) Cloning science is developing so rapidly that current assessments of its safety, efficacy and ethics cannot cover future changes in the technology. Those changes could lead to unpredictable and undesirable effects on the food supply, the animal populations involved, other animal species and perhaps even on humans.
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2) Scientific studies comparing ordinary and cloned animals can only discover differences that (a) are specifically looked for, and (b) happen to occur in the studied samples. Since cloning technology is relatively new and developing, the possibility that studies will miss important and undesirable differences with clone animals is higher than with well-established techniques and technologies. The studies can only find differences that are specifically targeted for observation. It is quite possible that differences that are not thought of at this time can occur, especially if cloning becomes more widespread and integrated into the food supply.
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3) While the FDA's primary role is not with ethics of cloning, the propriety of cloning is perhaps the most important aspect in the minds of most Americans. Many Americans will be uncomfortable with cloning for a variety of reasons. These range from concerns about financial motivations of breeders to religious perspectives on reproduction. If the FDA does not take these concerns into account, it is unlikely that other agencies or branches of government will be able to fully reflect these concerns.
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Even if the use of cloned animals in the food supply is approved, the FDA should require that food derived from cloned animals be clearly labeled for consumers. Consumers must be able to make their own choices about food. Cloning-based foods will not otherwise be distinguishable from traditionally-produced foods. Americans should have their concerns about food production reflected in the choices they make at the grocery store.
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Sincerely yours,<br>
Bryan D. Baker<br>
Apple Valley, California