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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tobacco Products

Celebrate Father’s Day

June 15, 2012

Sunday, June 17 is a day to honor and celebrate the most important men in our lives—fathers. This Father’s day, take the opportunity to show your dad just how much you care by looking out for his health. Encourage him to avoid unhealthy behaviors such as smoking or using smokeless tobacco products.

Bow with tag that reads Happy Father’s Day

Tell your dad that each year, an estimated 443,000 people die prematurely from smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, and another 8.6 million live with a serious illness caused by smoking1—and you don’t want him to be another statistic.
 

Share these Facts about Tobacco with your Dad

  • Compared with nonsmokers, smoking is estimated to increase the risk of men developing lung cancer by 23 times.2
  • Smokeless tobacco is not a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes.3
  • Smokeless tobacco use by men causes reduced sperm count and abnormal sperm cells.4
  • On average, smokers die 13 to 14 years earlier than nonsmokers.5

 

It’s Never Too Late to Quit

Fathers usually teach us not to quit. But in the case of tobacco use, quitting is the best option. And with the support of family and friends, quitting is also possible. Encourage your dad or another important man in your life to make a plan to quit this Father’s Day by taking advantage of the many resources available to achieve a healthier, happier life. Here are some of the best places to start:

 

Additional Resources

Pledge to Protect Kids from Tobacco
Facts about Teens and Tobacco Every Parent Needs to Know

 

View all past FDA feature articles here.

 

References
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1- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Tobacco Use: Targeting the Nation’s Leading Killer.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease
Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2011 [accessed 2012 June 14].

2- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004 [accessed 2012 June 14].

3- National Cancer Institute. Smokeless Tobacco or Health: An International Perspective. Bethesda: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, 1992 [accessed 2012 June 14].

4- World Health Organization. Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specific N-Nitrosamines disclaimer icon . (PDF – 3.18 MB) International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans Vol. 89. Lyon (France): World Health Organization, 2007 [accessed 2012 June 14].

5- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Annual Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Productivity Losses—United States, 1995–1999. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2002;51(14):300–3 [accessed 2012 June 14].