Safety

Bydureon (exenatide extended-release) for injectable suspension

Detailed View: Safety Labeling Changes Approved By FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)

September 2015

Summary View

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hypoglycemia with Concomitant Use of Insulin Secretagogues or Insulin
  • The risk of hypoglycemia is increased when exenatide is used in combination with insulin secretagogues (e.g., sulfonylureas) or insulin. Patients may require a lower dose of the secretagogue or insulin to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia in this setting

 

March 2015

Summary View

BOXED WARNING (edited)

WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS

  • Exenatide extended-release causes an increased incidence in thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in rats compared to controls. It is unknown whether BYDUREON causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of exenatide extended-release-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) and Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].
  • BYDUREON is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of BYDUREON and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (e.g., mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for detection of MTC in patients treated with BYDUREON [see Contraindications (4.1) and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Risk of Thyroid C-cell Tumors section edited
  • In both genders of rats, exenatide extended-release caused a dose-related and treatment-duration–dependent increase in the incidence of thyroid C-cell tumors (adenomas and/or carcinomas) at clinically relevant exposures compared to controls [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)]. A statistically significant increase in malignant thyroid C-cell carcinomas was observed in female rats receiving exenatide extended-release at 25-times clinical exposure compared to controls and higher incidences were noted in males above controls in all treated groups at =2-times clinicalexposure. The potential of exenatide extended-release to induce C-cell tumors in mice has not been evaluated. Other GLP-1 receptor agonists have also induced thyroid C-cell adenomas and carcinomas in male and female mice and rats at clinically relevant exposures. It is unknown whether BYDUREON will cause thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans as the human relevance of exenatide extended-release–induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined.
  • Cases of MTC in patients treated with liraglutide, another GLP-1 receptor agonist, have been reported in the postmarketing period; the data in these reports are insufficient to establish or exclude a causal relationship between MTC and GLP-1 receptor agonist use in humans.
  • BYDUREON is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC or in patients with MEN 2. Counsel patients regarding the potential risk of MTC with the use of BYDUREON and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (e.g. a mass in the neck, dsyphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness).
  • Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with BYDUREON. Such monitoring may increase the risk of unnecessary procedures, due to the low specificity of serum calcitonin testing for MTC and a high background incidence of thyroid disease. Significantly elevated serum calcitonin may indicate MTC and patients with MTC usually have values >50 ng/L. If serum calcitonin is measured and found to be elevated, the patient should be further evaluated. Patients with thyroid nodules noted on physical examination or neck imaging should also be further evaluated.

 

May 2014

Summary View

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.8 Injection-Site Reactions
  • There have been postmarketing reports of serious injection-site reactions (e.g., abscess, cellulitis, and necrosis), with or without subcutaneous nodules, with the use of BYDUREON. Isolated cases required surgical intervention [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)].

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

6.2 Postmarketing Experience
  • Allergy/Hypersensitivity: injection-site reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)].

17 Patient Counseling Information

17.6 Risk of Injection-Site Reactions
  • Inform patients that there have been postmarketing reports of serious injection-site reactions with or without subcutaneous nodules, with the use of BYDUREON. Isolated cases of injection-site reactions required surgical intervention. Advise patients to seek medical advice if symptomatic nodules occur, or for any signs or symptoms of abscess, cellulitis, or necrosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)].

Medication Guide

What are the possible side effects of BYDUREON?

BYDUREON can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Injection-site reactions. Serious injection-site reactions, with or without bumps (nodules), have happened in some people who use BYDUREON. Some of these injection-site reactions have required surgical intervention. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following at your injection site:
    • severe pain
    • swelling
    • blisters
    • an open wound
    • a dark scab

 

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