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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Safety

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Zyprexa Relprevv (olanzapine) for extended release injectable suspension

Detailed View: Safety Labeling Changes Approved By FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) – May and April 2010

 

May 2010 Summary View

 

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Vital Signs and Laboratory Studies
  • Within the larger premarketing Zyprexa Relprevv database of 1886 patients with baseline ALT ≤90 IU/L, the incidence of ALT elevation to >200 IU/L was 0.8%. None of these patients experienced jaundice or other symptoms attributable to liver impairment and most had transient changes that tended to normalize while Zyprexa Relprevv treatment was continued.
  • Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adults: An assessment of the premarketing experience for oral olanzapine revealed an association with asymptomatic increases in ALT, AST, and GGT. Within the original premarketing database of about 2400 adult patients with baseline ALT ≤90 IU/L, the incidence of ALT elevations to >200 IU/L was 2% (50/2381). None of these patients experienced jaundice or other symptoms attributable to liver impairment and most had transient changes that tended to normalize while olanzapine treatment was continued.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Pediatric Use
  • Compared to patients from adult clinical trials, adolescents treated with oral ZYPREXA were likely to gain more weight, experience increased sedation, and have greater increases in total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, prolactin and hepatic aminotransferase levels.

 

April 2010 Summary View

 

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hyperprolactinemia
  • As with other drugs that antagonize dopamine D2 receptors, olanzapine elevates prolactin levels, and the elevation persists during chronic administration. Hyperprolactinemia may suppress hypothalamic GnRH, resulting in reduced pituitary gonadotropin secretion. This, in turn, may inhibit reproductive function by impairing gonadal steroidogenesis in both female and male patients. Galactorrhea, amenorrhea, gynecomastia, and impotence have been reported in patients receiving prolactin-elevating compounds. Long-standing hyperprolactinemia when associated with hypogonadism may lead to decreased bone density in both female and male subjects.