• Decrease font size
  • Return font size to normal
  • Increase font size
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

For Consumers

  • Print
  • Share
  • E-mail

Health Scams! Don't take the risk.

Print and Share (1865 KB)

En Español

How to Spot a Scam… It’s Called Health Fraud 

• Lots of people are fooled into buying health products that sound great, but are really fakes. 

• Some products may cause serious problems like pain, suffering, or even death. 

• Some products may not mix well with your other medicines. 

• You may also lose your money on scam products that don’t work. 

 

Watch out for these claims. It might be a scam. 

 

It’s Natural 

Just because a product is called “natural” does not mean it is safe. It’s So Easy! Don’t believe promises like “lose weight while you sleep.” If it sounds too easy, it might be a scam. 

 

Miracle Cure! 

Generally, one pill will not treat or cure many different illnesses like cancer, diabetes, AIDS, or arthritis. It Worked For Me Personal success stories by “real people” or doctors are easy to make up. 

 

Pay Now and Save 

Don’t feel pressured to buy. Take time to get the facts about the product first. 

 

They Don’t Want You To Know 

Always feel free to ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist what is best for your health. Health Fraud… Don’t take the risk with your health or your money. You might see ads on TV or the Internet that make a lot of promises about a new health product. However, you don’t know if it can really help you. It may even hurt you. 

 

Protect yourself and your family

• Talk to a doctor, nurse, or pharmacist or call the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at 1-888-463-6332 before you use any health product 

• Get the facts about health fraud at: www.fda.gov/healthfraud 

• Report a problem with a product to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 

www.fda.gov/medwatch or 1-800-332-1088 

• Report false advertising to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) www.ftc.gov or 1-877-382-4357 

 

This information was produced in collaboration between FDA’s Office of Women’s Health and Office of Enforcement. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines health fraud as the deceptive promotion, advertising, distribution, or sale of a product represented as being effective to prevent, diagnose, treat, cure, or lessen an illness or condition, or provide another beneficial effect on health, but that has not been scientifically proven safe and effective for such purposes.