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FDA’s Read the Label Youth Outreach Campaign Empowers ‘Tweens’ to Make Healthy Food Choices

Food Basket

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition - Food and Drug Administration

June 3, 2014

An enhanced outreach campaign by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is helping teach young people (ages 9 to 13) to use the Nutrition Facts Label to make healthy food choices, a habit that will benefit them throughout their lives.

The campaign, titled “Read the Label,” is the next generation of the FDA’s “Spot the Block” campaign for ‘tweens,’ and for the first time includes an after-school component for educators in schools, summer camps, scout troops and community organizations.

The new component features a guide for afterschool and summer program leaders with activities to help kids understand the Nutrition Facts Label on food packages, and learn how to use that information to make healthy dietary choices. The new component recognizes that – like parents – educators can positively influence children with respect to nutrition. The comprehensive campaign also includes a wide assortment of downloadable, ready-to-use materials for community educators, families and kids.

Read the Label was originally launched (as FDA’s Spot the Block Tween Campaign) in 2007. Since then, it has expanded into a nationwide grassroots initiative through which kids, families and community outreach leaders unite with the goal of using the Nutrition Facts Label as their everyday tool for making smart food choices. It includes fun, easy tips and activities to help make label reading a key tool that today’s youth are equipped with to help achieve healthy childhood weight. 

Learn more about the program and obtain downloadable activities for kids, families and educators at www.fda.gov/nutritioneducation; choose Read the Label Youth Outreach Campaign. 

FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts Label for packaged foods. For more information, see Proposed Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label.