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Reducing Risk Factors in Retail and Food Service: Maricopa County, Arizona Environmental Health Division - Tripas

FDA/CFSAN is posting this document as a service to viewers of the November 30, 2006 satellite broadcast:
"Reducing Risk Factors in Retail and Food Service".

Maricopa County, Arizona Environmental Health Division

Tripas

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Transcript:

Tripas are a popular product found in local carnicerias. Tripas are composed of deep fried beef intestines.

The majority of carnicerias do not process meats inside a walk-in cold room, therefore special attention to times, temperatures and the frequency of cleaning food contact surfaces should be observed.

The initial preparation of this product may either begin with the cleaning of the intestines or directly with deep frying them.

Another product that is prepared very similarly to tripas is called boche. The difference between tripas and boche is that boche is deep fried pork stomach. Because of the relative nature of these products, it is important to cook tripas or boche to a minimum of 155°F for 15 seconds.

The cooking time for tripas or boche may be lengthy and therefore some carnicerias may choose to batch cook, cool and reheat these products in order to have them readily available for their clientele.

Remember, these products at a minimum should be cooled from 130°F* to 70°F within 2 hours and from 70°F to 41°F within 4** hours.

If the tripas or boche will not be consumed within a 24 hour period, it is important to datemark these products with 7 days hold time at 41°F or with 4 days hold time at 45°F.

When these products are ready to be reheated for hot holding, be sure to reheat these products to a minimum of 165°F for 15 seconds.

Once these products have been reheated, they are then placed in a display case for sale. Remember that at a minimum, these products should be held hot at 130°F***.

* The 2005 FDA Food Code says that these products must be cooled from 135°F to 70°F within 2 hours.
** The 2005 FDA Food Code says that these products must be cooled from 70°F to 41°F or less within a total of 6 hours.
*** The 2005 FDA Food Code says that these products should be hot held at 135°F.

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