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Guidance & Regulation

Photos Highlighting FDA's Food Protection Efforts

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Photo - An FDA research pharmacologist is shown developing tests designed to detect certain proteins in cattle feed.

April 2004: An FDA research pharmacologist is shown developing tests designed to detect certain proteins in cattle feed. The proteins, which are prohibited in cattle feed, may carry a risk for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease. Photo by Black Star/Dennis Brack for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]
 

Photo - FDA chemists in FDA’s Jamaica, N.Y., laboratory are shown preparing newly arrived samples of produce for examination and analysis.

September 18, 2007: FDA chemists in FDA’s Jamaica, N.Y., laboratory are shown preparing newly arrived samples of produce for examination and analysis. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]
 

Photo - FDA chemists are shown viewing data from food samples taken from a “digester,” a device used to identify and detect the presence of heavy metals, like mercury, in food products.

September 18, 2007: FDA chemists are shown viewing data from food samples taken from a “digester,” a device used to identify and detect the presence of heavy metals, like mercury, in food products such as milk, dietary supplements, juices, herbs, tea, and fish. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]

Photo - An FDA chemist is shown using a cell culture from a mouse brain in a bioassay to detect naturally occurring but potentially deadly toxins, such as red tide, in seafood.

September 18, 2007: An FDA chemist is shown using a cell culture from a mouse brain in a bioassay to detect naturally occurring but potentially deadly toxins, such as red tide, in seafood. The brain cells of mice react to the presence of such toxins in a manner similar to the brain cells of humans. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]
 

Photo - An FDA chemist is shown conducting a rapid screening using an automated immunoassay instrument to detect cell surface antigens of Salmonella on food products.

September 18, 2007: An FDA chemist is shown conducting a rapid screening using an automated immunoassay instrument to detect cell surface antigens of Salmonella on food products. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]

Photo - FDA chemists are shown preparing a DNA sample for insertion into a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device to detect DNA specific for an organism.

September 18, 2007 FDA chemists are shown preparing a DNA sample for insertion into a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device to detect DNA specific for an organism. The results will be displayed on a computer monitor as the samples are still processing. This technique helps FDA chemists quickly identify pathogens in food samples. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]
 

Photo - As part of an investigation into contaminated pet food, a scientist in FDA's Forensic Chemistry Center in Cincinnati is shown isolating foreign particles from contaminated wheat gluten.

April 2007: As part of an investigation into contaminated pet food, a scientist in FDA's Forensic Chemistry Center in Cincinnati is shown isolating foreign particles from contaminated wheat gluten for chemical analysis using a stereoscopic light microscope. In early 2007, pet food manufacturers voluntarily recalled more than 100 brands of dog and cat food across the United States. The recall was prompted by reported cases of cats and dogs that had developed kidney failure after eating products contaminated with melamine. Photo by Black Star/Chris Cone for FDA
[larger photo 300 dpi]

Photo - FDA chemists are shown using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device to detect DNA specific for an organism.

September 18, 2007: FDA chemists are shown using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device to detect DNA specific for an organism. The results are displayed on a computer monitor as the samples are still processing. This technique helps FDA chemists quickly identify pathogens in food samples. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]
 

Photo - A senior FDA import specialist is shown transporting samples of imported frozen shrimp from a commercial frozen food warehouse at Port Elizabeth, N.J., to the FDA laboratory in Jamaica, N.Y.

September 17, 2007: A senior FDA import specialist is shown transporting samples of imported frozen shrimp from a commercial frozen food warehouse at Port Elizabeth, N.J., to the FDA laboratory in Jamaica, N.Y., where they were later analyzed for the presence of malachite green. This is an example of an FDA audit sample where FDA has previously found problems with an importer’s product and placed the product, manufacturer, and/or shipper on an Import Alert. The importer is required to have the product tested by a private lab to demonstrate the product is in compliance and overcome the appearance of a violation. The FDA follows up with its own audit, taking samples for laboratory analysis. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]
 

Photo - DA import specialists are shown inspecting spices at a warehouse at Port Newark, N.J.

September 17, 2007: FDA import specialists are shown inspecting spices at a warehouse at Port Newark, N.J. This warehouse contains imported paprika, curry, and other spices. The inspector in the foreground is conducting a reconciliation exam, checking to make sure product information on the shipping labels and on the importer’s invoices match. The inspector in the background is packaging random micro-samples of spices to take back to the FDA lab for further examination and analysis. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]

Photo - An FDA imports specialist is shown opening a box of harvested hard-shell clams.

September 18, 2007: An FDA imports specialist is shown opening a box of harvested hard-shell clams. Because the water quality where the clams were harvested could not be verified, these clams are required to be pre-cooked before importation into the United States. Although the package indicated the clams were pre-cooked, they were not open, as is usually the case with cooked clams. This raised the suspicion of FDA inspectors. However, laboratory analysis confirmed the clams were in fact cooked and safe for consumers. Photo by Black Star/Michael Falco for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]

Photo - An investigator from FDA’s San Francisco District (left) is shown working with an investigator from the California Department of Health Services collecting soil samples.

February 2007: An investigator from FDA’s San Francisco District (left) is shown working with an investigator from the California Department of Health Services collecting soil samples as part of an investigation into an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in spinach. The contamination, which occurred during the fall of 2006 and sickened people in the United States and Canada, originated on farms in California. Photo by Black Star/Steve Yeater for FDA [larger photo 300 dpi]
 

 

 

 

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