• Decrease font size
  • Return font size to normal
  • Increase font size
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Animal & Veterinary

  • Print
  • Share
  • E-mail

2005 NARMS Retail Meat Annual Report - Introduction

The primary purpose of the NARMS retail meat surveillance program is to monitor the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among foodborne pathogenic and commensal organisms, in particular, Salmonella, Campylobacter, Enterococcus and E. coli  The results generated by the NARMS retail meat program will establish a reference point for analyzing trends of antimicrobial resistance among these foodborne bacteria.  NARMS retail meat surveillance is an ongoing collaboration between the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (Center for Veterinary Medicine), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and in 2005, all 10 of the current FoodNet laboratories: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, and Tennessee.  Bacterial isolates are sent to FDA/CVM for confirmation of species, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and genetic analysis.

For calendar year 2005, all test sites began retail meat sampling in January.  A total of 40 food samples were purchased per month comprised of 10 samples each of chicken breast, ground turkey, ground beef, and pork chops.  Samples were kept cold during transport from the grocery store(s) to the laboratory.  All ten FoodNet sites cultured the meats and poultry rinsates for the presence of Salmonella and Campylobacter.  Four of the ten FoodNet laboratories (Georgia, Maryland, Oregon, and Tennessee) also cultured meat and poultry rinsates for the presence of E. coli and Enterococcus.

Changes in 2005

In 2005, bacitracin was replaced with tigecycline on the panel of agents tested against Enterococcus. A total of 4781 meats samples were collected, compared with 4699 in 2004. Breakpoints were changed for bacitracin, kanamycin and lincomycin (see Table 1).

NARMS retail meat working group, 2005

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Jason Abbott
Sherry Ayers
Dr. Mary Bartholomew
Sonya Bodeis-Jones
Peggy Carter
Patti Cullen
Linda English
Sharon Friedman
Althea Glenn
Elvira Hall-Robinson
Susannah Hubert
Stuart Gaines
Shawn McDermott
Patrick McDermott
Terry Proescholdt
Sadaf Qaiyumi
David Wagner
Loretta Antoinette Walker
Robert Walker
David White
Shaohua Zhao
 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Fred Angulo
Tom Chiller
Felicita Medalla
Lauren Stancik-Rosenthal
Ezra Barzilay 
   

California

Richard Alexander
Melody Hung-Fan
Maribel Rickard 
 

Connecticut  

Robert Howard
Aristea Kinney
Mona Mandour
Ruthanne Marcus
Michael A. Pascucilla
Charlie Welles  
   

Colorado

Joe Gossack
Dee Jae Dutton
Melissa Jett
Marty Piper
 
 

Georgia

James Benson
Paul Blake
Bob Manning
Mahin Park 
   

Maryland

Karen Cuenco
Jonigene Ruark
Mary Warren 
 

Minnesota

Craig Braymen
Billie Juni
Fe Leano
Kirk Smith
Narina Stepanova
Stephanie Wedel
Yang Xiong 
   

New Mexico

Lisa Butler
Pauline Gutierrez
Paul Torres  
 

New York

Gina Conenello
Tashanda Bryant
Tim Root  
   

Oregon

Debbie Bergquist   
Emilio DeBess
Eric Espinosa
Trisha Hannan
Helen Packett
Larry Stauffer
Ivor Thomas
Robert Vega
Veronica Williams 
 

Tennessee  

Samir Hanna
Henrietta Hardin
Ryan Mason
Tim Jones
RuthAnn Spence 

Acknowledgements

Much thanks to Deborah Brooks, Michelle Talley and Hung Dang for providing outstanding web support to the NARMS program.