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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Advisory Committees

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CURRICULUM VITAE - George Gray, Ph.D.


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 

George M. Gray, Ph.D. is Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health and Director of the Center for Risk Science and Public Health at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Sciences. From 2005 to 2009 he served as the Assistant Administrator for the Office of Research and Development and the Science Advisor at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Prior to joining EPA George was Executive Director of the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis and a member of the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health. 

George’s primary research interests are risk characterization, risk communication and the role of science in policy-making. In government service he focused specifically on continued scientific excellence in EPA research, advocated the continuing evolution of EPA approaches to analysis and strongly encouraged programs that provided academic research to support the EPA’s mission. Areas of particular emphasis included nanotechnology, ecosystem research, the role of advances in toxicologic approaches in toxicity testing and risk assessment, and promoting sustainability. 

He has published on both the scientific bases of human health risk assessment and its application to risk policy with a focus on risk/risk tradeoffs in risk management. His professional service includes serving as a Councilor for the Society for Risk Analysis, and on the Risk Assessment Task Force, Congressional Task Force and Communications Committee of the Society of Toxicology. Other service includes the NIEHS National Advisory Environmental Health Science Council, and an IOM Committee evaluating the components of the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) food packages. 

George holds a B.S. degree in Biology from the University of Michigan, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Toxicology from the University of Rochester.