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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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What is a foodbourne illness and how do I keep my child safe?

Foodborne illness is a sickness that occurs when people eat or drink harmful microorganisms (bacteria, parasites, viruses) or chemical contaminants found in some foods or drinking water.  Symptoms vary, but in general can include: stomach cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, headache, or body aches. Sometimes you may not feel sick, but whether you feel sick or not, you can still pass the illness to your unborn child without even knowing it.
 

Foodborne illness is a serious health issue, especially for your new baby and any other children in your home. Each year in the U.S., 800,000 illnesses affect children under the age of 10. Infants and young children are particularly vulnerable to foodborne illness because their immune systems are not developed enough to fight off foodborne bacterial infections. That's why extra care should be taken when handling and preparing their food.
 

Food Safety for Moms-to-be: At-a-glance

Food Safety for Moms-to-be:Once Baby Arrives

Basics Question toggle Show all related FDA Basics Questions

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