• Decrease font size
  • Return font size to normal
  • Increase font size
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

About FDA

  • Print
  • Share
  • E-mail

Are all personal care products regulated as cosmetics?

Under the law, some of the products commonly referred to as "personal care products" are cosmetics. These include, for example, skin moisturizers, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, shampoos, permanent waves, hair colors, some toothpastes, and deodorants. 

Some, however, are regulated as drugs. Among these are skin protectants (such as lip balms and diaper ointments), mouthwashes marketed with therapeutic claims, antiperspirants, toothpastes with anti-cavity claims, and treatments for dandruff or acne. 
In addition, some "personal care products" may belong to other regulatory categories, including medical devices (such as certain hair removal and microdermabrasion devices), dietary supplements (such as vitamin or mineral tablets or capsules), or other consumer products (such as manicure sets).
Each of these product categories is regulated differently. To learn more, see Cosmetics Q&A: Are all personal care products regulated as cosmetics?, Is It a Cosmetic, a Drug, or Both? (Or Is It Soap?), and FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.
 
Basics Question toggle Show all related FDA Basics Questions

-

How helpful was this information?

                               

Not HelpfulArrow pointing to the rightVery Helpful


Please limit your feedback to 1000 characters.

Please limit your feedback to 1000 characters.

If you would like to ask a specific question, please visit our "Contact Us" page for more information about how to contact FDA.

Please note that any information you submit may become public or subject to release under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). For more information, read about our privacy policies and the FOIA.

-